Grapevine Archive for January, 2018

Tue 02 Jan 2018

Food Without Fuss: Pride of Pide

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This recipe, while hopefully of use and interest to all, was written with the New Year selections of our much-loved Wine Without Fuss subscription scheme particularly in mind.

Friendly, flexible and commitment-free, Wine Without Fuss is now better than ever, with five plans to suit every taste and budget. And you can cancel, change or skip an order at any time!

Why not join the growing band of members who let their Society take the strain, and are regularly glad they do?

I am a bit of a sucker for intrepidly tramping off the beaten track in search of new wine experiences; but I am still only skipping across the tip of an iceberg, because – depending on who you believe – there are up to 10,000 grape varieties around.

10,000! Really? That means that I have tasted less than 3% of wine grape varieties in more than 25 years of a deep, abiding interest in this wonderful drink. Complicating matters is the number of grape varieties with several names used in different places. The Italians, it sometimes seems, call a grape by a different name every 75 yards, and central Europe’s complicated historical upheavals are as nothing to the confusion over the nom de plumes of the Romanian variety babeasca neagra, which Wikipedia tells me has 105 synonyms.

What I am getting at here is that there is a wonderfully wide world of wine out there and a good deal of it is well, well worth a try. Sure, the likes of chardonnay, cabernet sauvignon, pinot noir, sauvignon blanc and syrah are familiar, classy and called ‘noble varieties’ for a reason, but there are so many other wonderful and fascinating grapes that will reward you with that something different, new experiences and flavours, and sometimes a real thrill.

Very often these wines have a moment of magic in them when paired with the food of the region from whence they come. The deep fruit framed by tannins and acidity of the saperavi grape of the Caucasus can make a great deal of sense with a Georgian lamb shashlik, for example. Turkey is one place that promises to reveal a feast of previously unknown wine treasures to match their varied regional cuisine, a cuisine that is making more and more inroads into the British restaurant scene, so increasing the exposure of people to Turkey’s ever-improving wines. All to the good, I say.

My recipe this time reflects something of this. A pide is rather like a boat-shaped Turkish pizza and is very versatile. It can be topped with almost anything you fancy and used to match all kinds of red or white wines depending on the version you choose to make, particularly the Turkish wines mentioned below, which are not only from the same part of the world but also showed themselves to be – when I selflessly tested them – absolutely perfect.

Steve Farrow

Minced Beef or Lamb Pide

Please don’t feel you have to limit yourself to the minced meat topping shown here. I have also made them with spinach and feta (or cream cheese or even Cheddar), garlic and cumin, or peppers, tomatoes and salami, or tomatoes, garlic and aubergine, or almost anything that you fancy will make a topping.

For the base:
• 7g sachet fast-action dried yeast
• 1 1/2 tsp caster sugar
• 300g strong bread flour, plus extra for dusting
• 2 tsp salt
• 2 tbsp olive oil, plus extra for oiling the baking sheets and drizzling
• 100ml cold water
• 25g butter, melted

For the topping:
• 1 tbsp olive oil
• 350 g minced beef or lamb
• 1 red onion, diced
• 3 cloves garlic, chopped
• 1 tsp tomato purée
• 1 tsp ground
• 1 tsp ground coriander
• 1 tsp turmeric
• 1 pinches ground cinnamon
• 400 g canned chopped tomatoes
• 1 tablespoon clear honey
• 3 tablespoons of sultanas
• salt and black pepper (plenty of the latter)
• picked or chopped coriander leaves
• 1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds, or a handful of toasted pine nuts if preferred.
• plain yogurt

1. Preheat the oven to 220C/gas 7 and lightly oil two baking trays.

2. Put the yeast and sugar in a small bowl and add 2 tbsp of tepid water; give it a quick stir and set aside until the mixture begins to froth after a few minutes.

3. Sift the flour into a mixing bowl. Make a well in the centre and add the salt. Pour in the yeast mixture and olive oil. Start to combine with your hands, then add the water little by little until the dough starts to come together, adding a drop or two more if needed to bind the dough. Tip the dough out onto a floured work surface/board and knead for 5-10 minutes until shiny and elastic. Put the kneaded dough into an oiled bowl, cover with cling film and leave somewhere to rise for an hour, until the dough has doubled in size.

4. Once the dough has risen, take it out of the bowl and divide it into four equal pieces and form each into an oval. Dust your work surface or board with flour, and dust the top of dough and roll it thinly into the shape of a flat boat or rugby ball, about the thickness of a 2p piece. Lift the flat ovals onto oiled baking sheets and brush them with melted butter. Set aside.

5. For the topping, over a medium heat fry the minced meat (beef or lamb) in 1 tbsp of oil until brown. Add the onion and cook until softened and then add the garlic for a couple more minutes. Add the tomato puree, ginger, cinnamon, coriander and turmeric, cook for two or three minutes and then add the chopped tomatoes, honey and sultanas, and simmer for 15 more minutes. Allow to cool slightly.

6. Pile the cooked mince mixture onto the dough ovals (we did ours quite thickly piled but you can spread it out a little more thinly, it’s up to you) leaving a centimetre or so clear around the edges, and turn up the edges to create a rim. I bake two pides at a time but if you can fit two onto each baking tray by all means do four at a time. Bake in the oven for 10-12 minutes, or until the dough is golden brown and the topping is hot through.

7. Once out of the oven, give the edges of the pides another brush with melted butter. Lay on a wooden board or serving platter and scatter with sesame seeds or pine nuts, drizzle with yogurt and olive oil, scatter with coriander leaves and serve.

Wine matches:
Try this or almost any version you like with the soft, fruity and fresh Öküzgözü Vinkara 2014 (£9.25) or the stone-fruit succulence of Narince Vinkara 2016 (2015 vintage available online for £8.50), both from the Wine Without Fuss ‘Discovery’ case.

Also good to match with the fragrant spice of the dish would be plummy but fresh fruit of Fauno Grenache-Shiraz-Monastrell 2015 from Spain (Wine Rack Essentials), the darker berries of the Nero d’Avola La Ferla Sicilia 2016 (Wine Rack Essentials), and the aromatic, spicy in their own right Silbador Rapel Gewürztraminer 2016 (£6.95, Wine Rack Essentials) and Villiera Estate Gewurztraminer, Stellenbosch 2017 (£7.95, Discovery) will meet spice with spice.

The juicy stone-fruits of The Liberator ‘Trample Dance’ Cape White Blend, Western Cape 2016 (£7.95, Wine Rack Essentials), and the scented Nero di Troia, Rasciatano 2015 (£8.95, Lighter Wines) will also stand with the pide very happily, while the Terrenus, Alentejo-Portalegre 2015 (£11.50, Worldwide Wonders) also brings both freshness and Iberian ripeness to the table. Finally with plenty of rich, dark fruit the Côtes-du-Rhône Le Temps est Venu, Stéphane Ogier 2015 (French Classics) will take on all comers if you make a meaty version of the pide.

Categories : Wine Without Fuss
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