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Build your own spiral wine cellar

diy
cellar

#21

Great achievement. This should be pinned somewhere for posterity and other aspirants. About 10 years too late for me as it would have been a great thing to do when getting a conservatory built but don’t think I would get ‘internal’ planning permission now if you get my drift…

Not sure there is a suitable topic heading…recipes doesn’t quite fit…


#22

Wow, amazing!


#23

Difficult to say but could probably build another one in 15 days.


#24

Yes, I will let you know if i become available :grin:


#25

The aesthetic value played a big part in the decision to construct a spiral.


#26

amazing Chris - and the ambient temperature is?


#27

Chris
It looks brilliant and you seem to have covered all the angles of the off the shelf ones, ie ventilation etc. Will be interesting to see how it proforms. Let us know.

Russ


#28

Great achievement.
Post of the week :slight_smile:


#29

Fantastic!!

I just had the real thing installed last summer. Very impressive you managed it for a fraction of the price (plus man hours and knowledge of course of which I possess neither). I was quoted 40k plus VAT for a rectangular cellar - due to our house location and sandy soil we would have had to sheet pile before doing either rectangular or spiral construction which is why the “free standing” spiral cellar was so attractive. It took them 48 hours to install mine. Our builder dug to 1.5m with a digger and then their team did the final 1.5m in less than a day by hand and began installation. All in all v impressive and after care v good. Is your’s surrounded by sheet piles (or similar)?
Ours was initially a concern as the pilot dig was in Autumn 2017 and then the ground water was at 1m below surface but by summer 2018 (especially helped by dry summer) it was dry all the way.


#30

My attempts to erect a Billy bookcase from Ikea nearly led to divorce. So this level of DIY is just a touch out of my league.


#31

That is exactly why I bought myself a new spice rack the other day, instead of building something resembling this:

image


#32

Chris 1, I am super impressed. It’s really quite a thing. Radiused plastering too . . . .

Should anyone else be tempted, I’ve found that much can be achieved with just a hole under the floor. OK, when does a hole become a cellar? Perhaps when it has a reasonable head height?

I have such a hole under my kitchen floor. From the underside of the floor joists it’s 3’ deep and came about when, needing to supply water to a sprinkler system for the house, I had to put a tank and pump somewhere. Underground seemed the obvious choice, so why not make the hole a bit bigger & store wine down there too? The basic rule is that when you dig in (or around) your house you should not go within a line that runs at 45 degrees out from the bottom of the foundations of any adjacent walls. Breaking the rule obviously happens but could then need proper calculations & engineering to keep your house standing.

I’ll not say much about construction methods as you may prefer to read about bottles & the stuff therein. Suffice to say, Hole is rectangular, has a ventilation pipe & a concrete slab floor like Chris 1’s. It’s lined with heavy duty polythene and the walls are made from concrete blocks laid on the flat (ie they are thick & thus strong). All painted with grey floor paint.

Temperature is constant enough, there’s no damp and there’s racking for circa 125 bottles, which is plenty for me now, plus space for about 5 doz in cases. Were I to have 5 doz in cases . . . The upper rows are accessible when kneeling by the open hatch. Climb down for the rest. In summer this can be rather a cooling experience, so I have found myself down there for longer than might be thought necessary to select a bottle.

OK, you’re not going to go at your floor with pick & shovel any old day of the week, but if you have works being done to your ground floor, then you could consider something quite shallow. 3’6”ish seems to be deep enough to get a cool temperature, in London clay at least, and there’s less chance of hitting the water table. You’d be able to have racking for circa 250 bottles in a 4’6” x 4’3” x 3’0” deep hole.


#33

No disrespect to anyone who has ever commented on this community site, on any of the topics… But this is probably the best wine revelation I have witnessed here so far.

I think it’s an amazing achievement, looks so impressive. Can I rent some shelves please? :wink:


#34

Current temperature in the cellar is 11.6 degrees Centigrade.


#35

Wonderful construction so congratulations on your efforts. I must admit though that if I was carrying heavy cases up and down 8 steep steps then I would want the security of a hand rail. I’m just glad that I live in an old house, cellars included.


#36

Just for clarity the angle of repose for soil is between 45 and 30 degrees, so I would be careful about undermining foundations if i were digging up my floor. The angle can be less if you’re on running sand and then there ground water. Dig carefully!


#37

You may as well have written that in Latin.


#38

Fode diligenter!


#39

If you remove the earth under your house it will fall down!!


#40

Matthew 7:24-27. I may be the first person in the community to reference a biblical text :rofl: